short ribs

Short Ribs with Barbecue Gravy

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Lots of people find January a big disappointment. It can be cold and dreary and sometimes seems like a letdown after months of holidays and celebrating.

But the food is good.

I like to call January cuisine. Filling, nourishing, comforting stuff.

Like short ribs.

 

Short Ribs with Barbecue Sauce

  • 5-6 pounds beef short ribs 
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 medium onions, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped chile pepper
  • 2 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 2 stalks celery, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1 cup ketchup 
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1 cup beer or ale
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar 
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar 
  • 2-3 thyme sprigs (or 1 teaspoon dried thyme)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Dry the surface of the meat with paper towels. Heat the vegetable oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Working in batches, cook the meat, turning the pieces to brown them, for 4-5 minutes or until lightly browned. (If the oil seems too dark, discard it, wipe the pan and add 2 fresh tablespoons vegetable oil.) Remove the meat and set it aside. Add the onions, garlic, chili pepper, carrots and celery to the pan and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the ketchup. Pour in the stock, beer, cider vinegar and soy sauce and stir the ingredients. Stir in the brown sugar. Return the meat to the pan and spoon some of the sauce over them. Place the thyme sprigs and bay leaf in the liquid. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Bring the liquid to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pan and cook at a bare simmer for about 4 hours or until the meat is fork tender (or place in the oven at 225 degrees).

Makes 6-8 servings

 

Veal Short Rib Stew

I love breast of veal and I also love short ribs, so when I saw these breast-of-veal short ribs in the store the other day I absolutely couldn’t resist. I braised them into a stew. 
  Why make stew n ow that fine weather is finally here after that cold, miserable, terribly snowy winter? 
 Because this one is light and satisfying without being too hearty.     
 Besides, there are still those days when I am rushed for time and in need of a quick dinner that I can make ahead, freeze and reheat in the oven. 
 Like stew. Like tonight. 
 If you can’t find veal breast short ribs, ask the butcher to cut up a veal breast for you. Or, make this dish using the whole breast of veal.                                                                                                                                        

 Veal Short Rib Stew                                                                                                                                                                                                            

 3 pounds veal short ribs 
 2 tablespoons olive oil 
 2 medium onions, cut into chunks 
 4 medium carrots, peeled and cut into chunks 
 2 large all-purpose or Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks 
 salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 
 2 large sprigs fresh thyme 
 1 cup white wine 
 3 medium tomatoes, cut into chunks 

 Wipe the surfaces of the meat and set them aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep saute pan over medium heat. Add the veal pieces and cook, turning them occasionally, until all sides are browned (about 10-12 minutes). Add the onions, carrots and potatoes to the pan. Sprinkle the ingredients with salt and pepper and place the thyme sprigs on top. Pour in the white wine. Bring the liquid to a boil. Cover the pan, turn the heat to low-medium and cook for one hour. Add the tomatoes, cover the pan and cook for another hour or until the meat is tender. 

 Makes 4 servings

I love breast of veal and I also love short ribs, so when I saw these breast-of-veal short ribs in the store the other day I absolutely couldn’t resist. I braised them into a stew.

Why make stew now that fine weather is finally here after that cold, miserable, terribly snowy winter?

Because this one is light and satisfying without being too hearty. 

Besides, there are still those days when I am rushed for time and in need of a quick dinner that I can make ahead, freeze and reheat in the oven.

Like stew. Like tonight.

If you can’t find veal breast short ribs, ask the butcher to cut up a veal breast for you. Or, make this dish using the whole breast of veal.                                                                                                                                       

Veal Short Rib Stew                                                                                                                                                                                                           

3 pounds veal short ribs

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, cut into chunks

4 medium carrots, peeled and cut into chunks

2 large all-purpose or Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 large sprigs fresh thyme

1 cup white wine

3 medium tomatoes, cut into chunks

Wipe the surfaces of the meat and set them aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep saute pan over medium heat. Add the veal pieces and cook, turning them occasionally, until all sides are browned (about 10-12 minutes). Add the onions, carrots and potatoes to the pan. Sprinkle the ingredients with salt and pepper and place the thyme sprigs on top. Pour in the white wine. Bring the liquid to a boil. Cover the pan, turn the heat to low-medium and cook for one hour. Add the tomatoes, cover the pan and cook for another hour or until the meat is tender.

Makes 4 servings

Red Wine Braised Short Ribs

Yesterday, when I was in New York City having a treat with my grand daughter Lila, we met a young couple from Sydney, Australia, who were visiting the United States. They’d already been to Los Angeles and Chicago and now New York, where they were taking in the museums and shows and having a great time.  Except, they said, they never anticipated how cold it would be here.  In Australia it’s summer. And even though they loved being here, they sort of missed the wonderful weather there.  I can’t blame them!  I wish I was there.   But I’m not. And I’m not going to any other sunny, balmy place either.  So I’m making food that makes me feel warm. That warms up the kitchen and makes everyone feel safe and comfy.  Like these short ribs:      Braised Short Ribs   1/4 cup all-purpose flour  salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste  5-6 pounds short ribs (4 pounds boneless)  4 tablespoons olive oil  2 medium onions, sliced  2 cloves garlic, chopped  4 carrots, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces  2 stalks celery, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces  3 cups beef stock  2 cups red wine  15 ounce can tomato sauce  2-3 sprigs fresh thyme  2 sprigs fresh rosemary  Mix the flour, salt and pepper in a dish. Dredge the meat, coating all sides, and set the ribs aside. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Cook the flour-coated ribs for 3-4 minutes per side or until lightly browned. Remove the meat to a dish. Add the remaining olive oil to the pan. Add the onions, garlic, carrots and celery and cook, stirring often, for 3-4 minutes. Return the meat to the pan. Pour in the stock and wine. Add the tomato sauce and stir it in. Add the thyme and rosemary sprigs. Cover the pan. Cook at a bare simmer for about 4 hours, or until the meat is tender. Remove the meat and vegetables to a dish. Discard the herb sprigs. Bring the liquid to a boil over high heat for about 6-8 minutes or until thickened. Pour the sauce over the meat to serve. Makes 6 servings

Yesterday, when I was in New York City having a treat with my grand daughter Lila, we met a young couple from Sydney, Australia, who were visiting the United States. They’d already been to Los Angeles and Chicago and now New York, where they were taking in the museums and shows and having a great time.

Except, they said, they never anticipated how cold it would be here.

In Australia it’s summer. And even though they loved being here, they sort of missed the wonderful weather there.

I can’t blame them!

I wish I was there. 

But I’m not. And I’m not going to any other sunny, balmy place either.

So I’m making food that makes me feel warm. That warms up the kitchen and makes everyone feel safe and comfy.

Like these short ribs:

 

Braised Short Ribs

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

5-6 pounds short ribs (4 pounds boneless)

4 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, sliced

2 cloves garlic, chopped

4 carrots, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces

2 stalks celery, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces

3 cups beef stock

2 cups red wine

15 ounce can tomato sauce

2-3 sprigs fresh thyme

2 sprigs fresh rosemary

Mix the flour, salt and pepper in a dish. Dredge the meat, coating all sides, and set the ribs aside. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Cook the flour-coated ribs for 3-4 minutes per side or until lightly browned. Remove the meat to a dish. Add the remaining olive oil to the pan. Add the onions, garlic, carrots and celery and cook, stirring often, for 3-4 minutes. Return the meat to the pan. Pour in the stock and wine. Add the tomato sauce and stir it in. Add the thyme and rosemary sprigs. Cover the pan. Cook at a bare simmer for about 4 hours, or until the meat is tender. Remove the meat and vegetables to a dish. Discard the herb sprigs. Bring the liquid to a boil over high heat for about 6-8 minutes or until thickened. Pour the sauce over the meat to serve. Makes 6 servings

Ale Braised Short Ribs

I had to throw out a lot of food after Hurricane Sandy hit last year. We lost power for 6 days and although we were able to eat lots of the stuff I had stored and brought some things to my sister-in-law and brother’s house, we couldn’t save everything and after all, there was just so much room in Eileen and Jeff’s freezer.  Much of what we discarded were the make-ahead meals that I freeze for when I will be coming home after a busy day and I’m too tired to cook or it’s too late. I plan ahead by taking out one of those packaged dinners. And all I have to do is put it in an ovenproof dish and pop it into the oven for cooking.  Or I call ahead and hope Ed is home to do that for me so that in addition to not having to cook, dinner is ready. Hot and ready!  I have a whole list of these make-ahead foods. I try to cook on Sundays, spending a quiet day at home doing what I love, making delicious things to eat and smelling all those wonderful, homey cooking perfumes you get from dishes like stew and Osso Buco and pot roast.  And this wonderful recipe for Ale-Braised Short Ribs. I made a fresh batch recently (along with some other good make-ahead meals) so I’m all set for a while.      Ale Braised Short Ribs       1/2 cup all-purpose flour    salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste    4 pounds boneless beef short ribs    3 tablespoons olive oil    6 carrots, peeled and sliced    3 onions, sliced   2 stalks celery, sliced   5-6 garlic cloves, sliced    1 bottle ale    28-ounce can tomatoes, chopped, liquid included    1 cup veal or beef stock    2-3 sprigs thyme    2 sprigs rosemary    salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste         Mix the flour, salt and pepper in a large dish. Press the meat into the flour to coat all sides. Set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Working in batches, cook the meat, turning the pieces occasionally, for 4-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove the meat and set it aside. Add the carrots, onions, celery and garlic to the pan and cook for 4-5 minutes. Add the ale, tomatoes and stock. Stir the ingredients. Place the thyme and rosemary on top. Bring the liquid to a boil. Return the meat to the pan and bring the liquid to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pan and cook at low heat for 3-1/2 to 4 hours (or in the oven at 250 degrees) or until the meat is fork tender. Remove the meat and vegetables to a serving platter. Bring the liquid in the pan to a boil and cook on high for 4-5 minutes or until the juices have thickened. Pour over the meat and vegetables and serve. (Alternately, separate the meat, vegetables and pan juices; refrigerate. Skim fat from juices when cold and proceed as above.) Makes 6-8 servings

I had to throw out a lot of food after Hurricane Sandy hit last year. We lost power for 6 days and although we were able to eat lots of the stuff I had stored and brought some things to my sister-in-law and brother’s house, we couldn’t save everything and after all, there was just so much room in Eileen and Jeff’s freezer.

Much of what we discarded were the make-ahead meals that I freeze for when I will be coming home after a busy day and I’m too tired to cook or it’s too late. I plan ahead by taking out one of those packaged dinners. And all I have to do is put it in an ovenproof dish and pop it into the oven for cooking.

Or I call ahead and hope Ed is home to do that for me so that in addition to not having to cook, dinner is ready. Hot and ready!

I have a whole list of these make-ahead foods. I try to cook on Sundays, spending a quiet day at home doing what I love, making delicious things to eat and smelling all those wonderful, homey cooking perfumes you get from dishes like stew and Osso Buco and pot roast.

And this wonderful recipe for Ale-Braised Short Ribs. I made a fresh batch recently (along with some other good make-ahead meals) so I’m all set for a while.

 

Ale Braised Short Ribs

 

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

4 pounds boneless beef short ribs

3 tablespoons olive oil

6 carrots, peeled and sliced

3 onions, sliced

2 stalks celery, sliced

5-6 garlic cloves, sliced

1 bottle ale

28-ounce can tomatoes, chopped, liquid included

1 cup veal or beef stock

2-3 sprigs thyme

2 sprigs rosemary

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

 

Mix the flour, salt and pepper in a large dish. Press the meat into the flour to coat all sides. Set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Working in batches, cook the meat, turning the pieces occasionally, for 4-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove the meat and set it aside. Add the carrots, onions, celery and garlic to the pan and cook for 4-5 minutes. Add the ale, tomatoes and stock. Stir the ingredients. Place the thyme and rosemary on top. Bring the liquid to a boil. Return the meat to the pan and bring the liquid to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pan and cook at low heat for 3-1/2 to 4 hours (or in the oven at 250 degrees) or until the meat is fork tender. Remove the meat and vegetables to a serving platter. Bring the liquid in the pan to a boil and cook on high for 4-5 minutes or until the juices have thickened. Pour over the meat and vegetables and serve. (Alternately, separate the meat, vegetables and pan juices; refrigerate. Skim fat from juices when cold and proceed as above.) Makes 6-8 servings

Short Ribs with Barbecue Sauce

It took me over 5 hours to get home last night. It usually takes 50-75 minutes.  And in addition to the frightening drive on icy roads, I had barely 1/4 tank of gas.  On my way in to NYC from Connecticut in the morning there were no open gas stations. Going back home later, I found one on the highway — they only had regular and my car needs premium, but I bought some anyway. Which was a good thing because otherwise I never would have made it home.  We were stopped for over an hour because of the need to clear accidents on the icy road.  But I have to say that when we could drive, everyone was careful, cautious and respectful. I have never seen this kind of courtesy or caution before. No one drove faster than 10 MPH. No one switched lanes. No one tailgated. Everyone left enough room so that if a car skidded — which mine did 3-4 times — there would be plenty of room and time to straighten out.  Thank you, thank you, fellow drivers.  I learned from a  storm  long ago, to carry water and snacks in the car. I had graham crackers, pistachio nuts, a clementine and leftover coffee in a thermos.  It was the most nerve wracking drive I’ve ever taken. I spent the time listening to the radio in between thinking about what I would do if I hit another car or my car swerved off onto the grass or I ran out of gas.  I have to confess to more than one or two fantasies about my car skidding off the road, into the railing and over the edge into an icy stream. And about snow-laden trees falling on my car.  But I got home. And I was grateful to get home safely. It didn’t matter that it took so long.   And I am lucky because there was a hot dinner, a set table and a glass of wine waiting for me.  I had cooked some short ribs recently and during the power outage they stayed cold in the freezer, the plastic container packed in ice. Ed put them in a casserole, put them in the oven and  voila!  dinner.  So, I recommend making a load of these, store them in portions in your freezer and then you can have dinner in a flash when needed too.  Stay safe everyone.      Short Ribs with Barbecue Sauce      5-6 pounds beef short ribs     2 tablespoons olive oil   2 medium onions, sliced    2 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks    2 stalks celery, peeled and cut into chunks     2 medium parsnips, peeled and cut into chunks      2 cups cubed, peeled butternut squash     1 cup ketchup       1 cup red wine       1 cup beer       1 cup beef stock       1/4 cup apple cider vinegar       2 teaspoons Worcestershire Sauce       3 tablespoons brown sugar       2-3 thyme sprigs       1 bay leaf    salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste   Dry the surface of the meat with paper towels. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Working in batches, cook the meat, turning the pieces to brown them, for 4-5 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove the meat and set it aside. Add the onions, carrots, celery, parsnips and squash to the pan and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the ketchup. Pour in the red wine, beer, stock, cider vinegar and Worcestershire Sauce and stir the ingredients. Stir in the brown sugar. Return the meat to the pan and spoon some of the sauce over them. Place the thyme sprigs and bay leaf in the liquid. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Bring the liquid to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pan and cook at a bare simmer for 4-5 hours or until the meat is fork tender (or place in the oven at 225 degrees). Makes 6 servings    

It took me over 5 hours to get home last night. It usually takes 50-75 minutes.

And in addition to the frightening drive on icy roads, I had barely 1/4 tank of gas.

On my way in to NYC from Connecticut in the morning there were no open gas stations. Going back home later, I found one on the highway — they only had regular and my car needs premium, but I bought some anyway. Which was a good thing because otherwise I never would have made it home.

We were stopped for over an hour because of the need to clear accidents on the icy road.

But I have to say that when we could drive, everyone was careful, cautious and respectful. I have never seen this kind of courtesy or caution before. No one drove faster than 10 MPH. No one switched lanes. No one tailgated. Everyone left enough room so that if a car skidded — which mine did 3-4 times — there would be plenty of room and time to straighten out.

Thank you, thank you, fellow drivers.

I learned from a storm long ago, to carry water and snacks in the car. I had graham crackers, pistachio nuts, a clementine and leftover coffee in a thermos.

It was the most nerve wracking drive I’ve ever taken. I spent the time listening to the radio in between thinking about what I would do if I hit another car or my car swerved off onto the grass or I ran out of gas.

I have to confess to more than one or two fantasies about my car skidding off the road, into the railing and over the edge into an icy stream. And about snow-laden trees falling on my car.

But I got home. And I was grateful to get home safely. It didn’t matter that it took so long. 

And I am lucky because there was a hot dinner, a set table and a glass of wine waiting for me.

I had cooked some short ribs recently and during the power outage they stayed cold in the freezer, the plastic container packed in ice. Ed put them in a casserole, put them in the oven and voila! dinner.

So, I recommend making a load of these, store them in portions in your freezer and then you can have dinner in a flash when needed too.

Stay safe everyone.

 

Short Ribs with Barbecue Sauce

 

5-6 pounds beef short ribs 

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, sliced

2 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks

2 stalks celery, peeled and cut into chunks

2 medium parsnips, peeled and cut into chunks

2 cups cubed, peeled butternut squash

1 cup ketchup 

1 cup red wine 

1 cup beer 

1 cup beef stock 

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar 

2 teaspoons Worcestershire Sauce 

3 tablespoons brown sugar 

2-3 thyme sprigs 

1 bay leaf

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Dry the surface of the meat with paper towels. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Working in batches, cook the meat, turning the pieces to brown them, for 4-5 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove the meat and set it aside. Add the onions, carrots, celery, parsnips and squash to the pan and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the ketchup. Pour in the red wine, beer, stock, cider vinegar and Worcestershire Sauce and stir the ingredients. Stir in the brown sugar. Return the meat to the pan and spoon some of the sauce over them. Place the thyme sprigs and bay leaf in the liquid. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Bring the liquid to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pan and cook at a bare simmer for 4-5 hours or until the meat is fork tender (or place in the oven at 225 degrees). Makes 6 servings

 

Bulgogi

This is not your grandmother’s flanken. But it is flanken, aka shortribs. And this meat can be tough and chewy, which is why grandma poached it in soup or in a slow-cooker with some good brown gravy or sweet and sour sauce.  I loved grandma’s flanken.  But, maybe because I don’t eat meat that often and yet think of myself as a devoted carnivore, I decided to put flanken and summer together using a grill.  So I made Bulgogi, a Korean dish in which the shortribs marinate in a soy-sesame oil based sauce before being grilled.  Yes, the meat is not as tender as other cuts, like rib. But much cheaper and, for meat lovers, gives quite a satisfying resilience. I served the Bulgogi with sauteed bok choy and steamed rice.  YUM.    Bulgogi    1/4 cup soy sauce 3 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons sake (or rice wine or sherry) 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 tablespoon sesame oil 3 scallions, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds, finely crushed  1/2 to 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper  3 pounds flanken or boneless short rib toasted sesame seeds for garnish, optional  Place the soy sauce, sugar, sake, vegetable oil, sesame oil, scallion, garlic, sesame seeds and crushed red pepper in a bowl and stir, making sure to dissolve the sugar. Place the beef in a non-reactive dish and turn the pieces to coat all sides. Let marinate in the refrigerator for at least one hour. Preheat the oven broiler or outdoor grill (or use a grill pan), skewer the meat and grill for 3-4 minutes per side or until crispy and done to your liking. Garnish with a small amount of toasted sesame seeds if desired.    Makes 4-6 servings

This is not your grandmother’s flanken. But it is flanken, aka shortribs. And this meat can be tough and chewy, which is why grandma poached it in soup or in a slow-cooker with some good brown gravy or sweet and sour sauce.

I loved grandma’s flanken.

But, maybe because I don’t eat meat that often and yet think of myself as a devoted carnivore, I decided to put flanken and summer together using a grill.

So I made Bulgogi, a Korean dish in which the shortribs marinate in a soy-sesame oil based sauce before being grilled.

Yes, the meat is not as tender as other cuts, like rib. But much cheaper and, for meat lovers, gives quite a satisfying resilience. I served the Bulgogi with sauteed bok choy and steamed rice.

YUM.


Bulgogi


1/4 cup soy sauce
3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons sake (or rice wine or sherry)
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon sesame oil
3 scallions, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds, finely crushed
1/2 to 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
3 pounds flanken or boneless short rib
toasted sesame seeds for garnish, optional

Place the soy sauce, sugar, sake, vegetable oil, sesame oil, scallion, garlic, sesame seeds and crushed red pepper in a bowl and stir, making sure to dissolve the sugar. Place the beef in a non-reactive dish and turn the pieces to coat all sides. Let marinate in the refrigerator for at least one hour. Preheat the oven broiler or outdoor grill (or use a grill pan), skewer the meat and grill for 3-4 minutes per side or until crispy and done to your liking. Garnish with a small amount of toasted sesame seeds if desired.

Makes 4-6 servings