roasted cauliflower

Roasted Cauliflower with Crumbs

Roasted Cauliflower with Crumbs

Roasted Cauliflower with Crumbs

I recently read Mark Twain’s novel “The Tragedy of Puddin’head Wilson,” a story about what happens after two babies are switched and their real identities are lost almost forever.

In addition to being a good read, filled with humor and irony, this book also includes a character who keeps a diary where he writes wise sayings.

I always wondered where this famous Twain quote came from: “Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education.” Now I know.

I recommend the book. Also recommend this cauliflower dish, which is so easy to prepare you don’t need a college eduction to make it.

Roasted Cauliflower with Crumbs

  • 3/4 cup Panko

  • 1 large clove garlic, finely chopped

  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

  • 1 large head cauliflower, cut into florets

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Mix the Panko, garlic and dill together and set aside. In a large bowl, mix the olive oil and mustard together until thoroughly blended. Place the cauliflower in the mustard-oil bowl and toss to coat the pieces on all sides. Place the coated pieces on a baking sheet. Scatter the Panko over the pieces and toss to coat the pieces lightly. Roast for about 15 minutes or until crispy and tender, turning the pieces once or twice. Most of the crumbs will separate from the cauliflower. Place the cauliflower in a serving dish, scatter the crumbs on top.

Makes 6 servings

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Garlic, Sea Salt and Lime

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Recently, Faye Levy, noted cookbook author and food writer, wrote a piece for the Jerusalem Post about Cara Mangini, the "Vegetable Butcher." She also posted about it on Facebook. Then she asked if anyone else prepared "cauliflower steaks."

I do! Have done. Many times!

We are a family of cauliflower lovers and the "steaks" -- that is, thick slices cut from a whole head of cauliflower -- look beautiful on a plate, making them a special side dish at dinner.

I have a recipe for cauliflower steaks in my latest cookbook, The Modern Kosher Kitchen. Thanks for posting this, Liz Rueven, at kosherlikeme.com.

Note -- the steaks taste the same as any other "cut" of cauliflower.

The cutting takes some doing, and a very sharp chef's knife. Also, truth to tell, the smaller sections at the side of the cauliflower head fall away into regular florets. No worries. Cook them alongside the steaks. They're like the "burnt ends" that you get from barbecue -- no one ever complains about those, do they?

After the cutting, its' simple. A bit of oil and seasoning.

Like this recipe:

 

Roasted Cauliflower with Garlic, Sea Salt and Lime

  • 1 head cauliflower
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • sea salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Remove the green leaves at the bottom of the cauliflower and trim most of the fibrous stem attached to the head. Slice the head into “steaks” about 3/8-inch thick. Rinse and dry the slices on paper towels. Combine the olive oil, garlic and Dijon mustard and brush this mixture on both sides of the cauliflower slices. Place the slices on the parchment. Sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 15 minutes. Turn the slices over and roast for another 10-15 minutes or until tender and crispy. Sprinkle the roasted cauliflowers steaks with lime juice. Note: for smaller pieces that fall away when you slice the head, cook along with the steaks. They may be done sooner, so look at them about 5 minutes ahead, or let them get browner, no harm done.

Makes 4 servings

You can never have too much caulifower

Frequently, if I am at a loss for what to serve as a side dish with dinner, I opt for cauliflower. There's always a head in the house. I can clean it quickly while the oven preheats. It's one of the milder cabbages, so everyone in the family likes it. And it is so incredibly flexible that, after a rubdown with olive oil I can squirt it with lemon juice or some other liquid, like maybe wine. I can season it with just about any spice or herb. I can give it a final flourish of cheese if I wish. 

I can break the cauliflower head into small chunks or cut it into thick slices, like "steak" (a recipe from The Modern Kosher Kitchen). Or roast it whole.

Saute it instead of roasting it in the oven.

Make it into salad.

And so on.

This is the latest version. Quick. Easy. Goes with everything.

 

Roasted Cauliflower

  • 1 small cauliflower
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano or marjoram
  • salt to taste
  • ½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper (substitute ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper. Wash the cauliflower, trim the ends and break the head up into smaller pieces. Wipe dry with paper towels. Mix the olive oil and white wine vinegar in a large bowl. Add the cauliflower pieces and toss the pieces to coat them on all sides. Place the pieces on the prepared sheet, drizzling them with oil left n the bowl. Sprinkle with the oregano, salt and pepper. Roast for 20 minutes, turning the pieces occasionally, or until the pieces are crispy and lightly browned.

Makes 4 servings

Lemon-Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower

The cauliflowers have been so beautiful lately that … 
 Oh wait. Am I really raving over how a vegetable looks? 
 It sounds funny, even as I am writing this, to talk about cauliflower and beauty in the same sentence. But there it is. When a cauliflower is fresh and the head is creamy white (unless it’s a green or purple cauliflower and then of course I would be saying green or purple) and the florets are compact and tight and the green leaves are crisp and moist looking, then yes. A cauliflower is beautiful. 
 I’ve bought a few in recent days. 
 They are as delicious as they are tasty. There is something wonderful about food that’s fresh, isn’t there? And fresh cauliflower is so easy to cook. 
 So I’ve been cooking with it.  
 My kids have been roasting vegetables at their house, so I roasted some cauliflower in mine. This dish was especially tasty because of the extra cheese added near the end; the cheese gives the vegetable a nice tang and some extra crispiness. But of course you can skip the cheese and just leave the lemony-roasted part and that’s good too. 

 Lemon-Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower 

 1 small head cauliflower 
 2 tablespoons olive oil 
 2 tablespoons lemon juice 
 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary 
 1 teaspoon grated fresh lemon peel 
 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 
 salt to taste 

 Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Remove the green leaves at the bottom of the cauliflower and trim most of the fibrous stem attached to the head. Slice the head into 1/2-inch slices; rinse and dry the slices on paper towels. Combine the olive oil, lemon juice, rosemary and lemon peel in a large bowl. Add the cauliflower slices and toss to coat them completely. Place the cauliflower slices in a single layer on the parchment. Roast for 10 minutes. Sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and salt to taste. Roast for another 20 minutes or until tender and crispy. Makes 4 servings

The cauliflowers have been so beautiful lately that …

Oh wait. Am I really raving over how a vegetable looks?

It sounds funny, even as I am writing this, to talk about cauliflower and beauty in the same sentence. But there it is. When a cauliflower is fresh and the head is creamy white (unless it’s a green or purple cauliflower and then of course I would be saying green or purple) and the florets are compact and tight and the green leaves are crisp and moist looking, then yes. A cauliflower is beautiful.

I’ve bought a few in recent days.

They are as delicious as they are tasty. There is something wonderful about food that’s fresh, isn’t there? And fresh cauliflower is so easy to cook.

So I’ve been cooking with it. 

My kids have been roasting vegetables at their house, so I roasted some cauliflower in mine. This dish was especially tasty because of the extra cheese added near the end; the cheese gives the vegetable a nice tang and some extra crispiness. But of course you can skip the cheese and just leave the lemony-roasted part and that’s good too.

Lemon-Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower

1 small head cauliflower

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary

1 teaspoon grated fresh lemon peel

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Remove the green leaves at the bottom of the cauliflower and trim most of the fibrous stem attached to the head. Slice the head into 1/2-inch slices; rinse and dry the slices on paper towels. Combine the olive oil, lemon juice, rosemary and lemon peel in a large bowl. Add the cauliflower slices and toss to coat them completely. Place the cauliflower slices in a single layer on the parchment. Roast for 10 minutes. Sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and salt to taste. Roast for another 20 minutes or until tender and crispy. Makes 4 servings