Salmon Wellington

Everyone I know who’s Irish has told me that in Ireland they never cook corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day. That that dish is an American thing. And sure enough, several years ago when Ed and I toured that beautiful, lushly-green, people-always-smiling country, we also heard that corned beef and cabbage is for Americans. That in Ireland, on St. Patrick’s Day, they eat all sorts of food, especially ham and salmon. Ed and I feasted on salmon all over Ireland. Glorious, tender, succulent salmon, fresh as fresh could be, mostly roasted but sometimes grilled. But there’s so much you can do with salmon. It’s a kind of entree you could make 2-3 ways 2-3 times a week. For example, if you’re up to cooking something festive for family or company, try this recipe for Salmon Wellington (which you can make ahead and reheat). Salmon Wellington 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, sliced thin 1-1/2 cups sliced mushrooms 1/2 cup white wine 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 8 puff pastry squares, thawed 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 4 pieces of salmon filet, each about 5 ounces, 3/4-inch thick 1 large egg, beaten Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the butter and olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. When the butter has melted and looks foamy, add the onion and mushrooms and cook for 3-4 minutes or until the vegetables have softened and the liquid in the pan has evaporated. Add the wine, turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cook until the wine has evaporated. Remove the pan from the heat and season with dill and salt and pepper to taste. Let cool. Roll each pastry sheet into a 6-inch square on a lightly floured surface. Spread 4 of the squares with an equal amount of the mustard (leave at least 1/2-inch edge). Spoon equal amounts of the onion mixture on top. Place one salmon filet over the vegetables on each square. Brush a film of beaten egg around the entire perimeter of each of the squares. Place a second square over the fish, then enclose the fish by crimping the edges all around. Place the packages on a cookie sheet. Brush with some egg. Bake for about 20 minutes or until golden brown. Makes 4 servings

Everyone I know who’s Irish has told me that in Ireland they never cook corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day. That that dish is an American thing.

And sure enough, several years ago when Ed and I toured that beautiful, lushly-green, people-always-smiling country, we also heard that corned beef and cabbage is for Americans. That in Ireland, on St. Patrick’s Day, they eat all sorts of food, especially ham and salmon.

Ed and I feasted on salmon all over Ireland. Glorious, tender, succulent salmon, fresh as fresh could be, mostly roasted but sometimes grilled.

But there’s so much you can do with salmon. It’s a kind of entree you could make 2-3 ways 2-3 times a week.

For example, if you’re up to cooking something festive for family or company, try this recipe for Salmon Wellington (which you can make ahead and reheat).

Salmon Wellington

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 medium onion, sliced thin

1-1/2 cups sliced mushrooms

1/2 cup white wine

2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

8 puff pastry squares, thawed

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

4 pieces of salmon filet, each about 5 ounces, 3/4-inch thick

1 large egg, beaten

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the butter and olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. When the butter has melted and looks foamy, add the onion and mushrooms and cook for 3-4 minutes or until the vegetables have softened and the liquid in the pan has evaporated. Add the wine, turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cook until the wine has evaporated. Remove the pan from the heat and season with dill and salt and pepper to taste. Let cool. Roll each pastry sheet into a 6-inch square on a lightly floured surface. Spread 4 of the squares with an equal amount of the mustard (leave at least 1/2-inch edge). Spoon equal amounts of the onion mixture on top. Place one salmon filet over the vegetables on each square. Brush a film of beaten egg around the entire perimeter of each of the squares. Place a second square over the fish, then enclose the fish by crimping the edges all around. Place the packages on a cookie sheet. Brush with some egg. Bake for about 20 minutes or until golden brown. Makes 4 servings